The Oracle

Tattoos are art too

Maya+Betts+and+her+sister%2C+Taylor%2C+share+the+same+tattoo+to+signify+their+connection+and+support+for+one+another.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Tattoos are art too

Maya Betts and her sister, Taylor, share the same tattoo to signify their connection and support for one another.

Maya Betts and her sister, Taylor, share the same tattoo to signify their connection and support for one another.

Courtesy of Maya Betts

Maya Betts and her sister, Taylor, share the same tattoo to signify their connection and support for one another.

Courtesy of Maya Betts

Courtesy of Maya Betts

Maya Betts and her sister, Taylor, share the same tattoo to signify their connection and support for one another.

Danial Nam, Managing Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






When walking alone in the dark what makes you more scared; a man with no tattoos or a man with sleeves? Often times it would be the one with tattoos, but this negative connotation is often because of parents, media, and stereotypes. However, even if tattoos can be a sign of “rebellious” behavior, it can be something much more.

Tattoos and piercings often have negative connotations in society, but as they become more common, it is important to realize that tattoos and piercings are also a way for people to express themselves.

While tattoos can be intimidating, they often have deeper meanings and are more than just a piece of art. They can be a permanent reminder of the things that matter to you the most.

“[I have a] tattoo of the letters DBB on my arm,” said senior Jack Caussin. “[It] stands for dream, believe, become. It’s a motto I live by every day.”

Senior Alyssa Morroni also has several tattoos on her body. Similar to Caussin, these tattoos have different origins and meaning behind them. Each one is a reminder of what is important to her.

“The tattoo on my ribs are significant because it reminds me that hard work pays off,” said Morroni. “The tattoo on my ankle is the same as my mom and connects us.”

While a small percentage of students at WS have tattoos, piercings are much more common. Whether they are ear, nose, belly, or lip piercings, they are all around the school. While many people also view piercings negatively, they are often used as a way of expression.

“My piercings I mainly like because I think they are pretty,” said junior Maya Betts. “I have two [piercings] on each ear and one nose piercing.”

Despite what previous generations think, it is important to move on and change as society changes as well. This negative connotation around tattoos and piercings are present, but

“Piercings and tattoos are a good way for people to express themselves and be able to share their personality through their body,” said Betts. “Too many piercings and tattoos might not be liked by everyone, but if that is how someone wants to express themselves, then I don’t think it matters.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Navigate Left
  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    There’s a new predator coming to WS

  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    Divya Gupta mixes horror with beauty

  • Features

    Preparing for the prom season

  • Features

    The NHD road to regionals

  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    Spartan Girl Scouts make an impact

  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    Programming a better future

  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    Abroad for college: Seniors explore the world

  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    True Dedication

  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    Winter Spartan athletes graduating on to their next season

  • Tattoos are art too

    Features

    AP Scholar Breakfast recognizes Spartan scholars

Navigate Right
West Springfield High School Newspaper
Tattoos are art too