Delirium Will Make You Delirious for a Sequel

Courtesy of Filmaffinity Chernin Entertainment

Nesma Khalafalla, Staff Writer

Have you ever wondered why everyone speaks so fondly of love? People say it’s one of the greatest emotions, but when you lose that significant emotion it can become one of the greatest pains. This is why in Delirium’s society love is considered a disease. It’s an emotion that makes even the most confident and brave people nervous and speechless. In the movie, love is described as a liability and even lethal. In this dystopian society, the government is trying to rid the world of love because it makes people do the craziest things. Throughout the story you see how people cope with a life without love and how some rebel against it.

This is definitely a movie everyone should watch because it shows a world without emotion. The people in this society believe that love clouds their judgment because so many of the decisions people make are based around how it affects the people they care about. When people in Delirium turn sixteen, they take a cure that essentially makes them emotionless. This was such a mind-blowing aspect to think about because so many of our actions are based around emotion. Love is an important part of life, but I didn’t think much of it until I watched this movie.

This movie focuses on fifteen-year-old Lena, played by Emma Roberts, who is only a couple months away from getting “cured.” She’s told that love is a terrible thing that needs to be taken away from the world, and she never questions why love is so horrible because she believes that love is the thing that killed her mom. However, when she meets Alex, played by Daren Kagasoff, he contradicts everything she has accepted as the truth. Lena must determine whether she wants to run away to the Wilds, a place where the people “diseased” with love go, or take the cure. Everything Lena has known turns into a question mark as she decides whether to listen to her head or her heart. I’ll admit the beginning of the movie was mundane, but I promise you it’s worth the wait.